Wednesday, August 31, 2016

How can we achieve Inner Sanctuary?

What Is Meditation? My students answer: "Being With Myself"

by Kathleen Lisson

When I asked my meditation students in week three of my IPSB Meditation and Mindfulness class to define meditation, I received some surprising answers. I had taught them in week one that meditation is nonjudgemental intentional focused attention to the present moment and we had experienced this type of attention by following our breath, inhale and exhale, for ten minutes. Three weeks later, my students were reporting that meditation was, to them, the practice of knowing and being with themselves. They had instinctively grasped the power of meditation to lead the way to their inner sanctuary.


Both seated meditation and walking the labyrinth can provide this experience of inner awareness. In today’s society of 24-hour news cycles and social media, we are urged to learn an astounding amount of information about other people, from national politicians to our old college friends’ constant stream of baby pictures. A balanced focus on both self and others on can be lost, especially for the sandwich generation of adults caring for both children and their own aging parents. Meditation can be an ideal practice to gently rebalance our lives and allow us to rejoin our inner sanctuaries, especially during times of great stress.

Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Monday, August 29, 2016

Treatments for Injured Runners in San Diego

What to Do When You Are Injured - 

Meditation, Massage and Chiropractic 

Treatments for Runners


by Kathleen Lisson

I am a half marathon runner, an ACE Certified Personal Trainer and a RRCA Certified Running Coach in San Diego, CA. In late December 2014, a few months after my 40th birthday, I tripped while trail running in Idyllwild, Ca and suffered a grade two sprain of my right ankle. I had to hobble a mile out of the woods to our car and watched in frustration as my ankle swelled and bruised black and blue.  I was signed up to run the Carlsbad half marathon in three weeks time and reluctantly transferred my bib to another runner the day the doctor put me in a walking boot. I was in the walking boot for the month of January 2015 and wore it all day except for in the shower.

My new lack of mobility was disheartening. I did convince my physician that I should be able to walk 15 minutes a day, but she flatly stated I couldn’t run at all. I have always been an active person and had previously dealt with difficult emotions by taking a long run by the ocean or in nature. More importantly to me, I had lost my identity as a runner. I had previously filled my Facebook stream with status updates from local running teams, upcoming races and running shops. I had to unlike all of them because reading Facebook became a painful reminder of the fact that I was not able to participate in my favorite sport.

My 15 minute walk around the neighborhood in my boot became the highlight of my day.

Meditation for Runners

by Kathleen Lisson

I am a half marathon runner, an ACE Certified Personal Trainer and a RRCA Certified Running Coach in San Diego, CA. In late December 2014, a few months after my 40th birthday, I tripped while trail running in Idyllwild, Ca and suffered a grade two sprain of my right ankle. I had to hobble a mile out of the woods to our car and watched in frustration as my ankle swelled and bruised black and blue.  I was signed up to run the Carlsbad half marathon in three weeks time and reluctantly transferred my bib to another runner the day the doctor put me in a walking boot. I was in the walking boot for the month of January 2015 and wore it all day except for in the shower.

My new lack of mobility was disheartening. I did convince my physician that I should be able to walk 15 minutes a day, but she flatly stated I couldn’t run at all. I have always been an active person and had previously dealt with difficult emotions by taking a long run by the ocean or in nature. More importantly to me, I had lost my identity as a runner. I had previously filled my Facebook stream with status updates from local running teams, upcoming races and running shops. I had to unlike all of them because reading Facebook became a painful reminder of the fact that I was not able to participate in my favorite sport.

My 15 minute walk around the neighborhood in my boot became the highlight of my day.

Luckily, I had enrolled in a meditation program for athletes before my injury (mPEAK at the UCSD Center for Mindfulness), so I hobbled into the first week of meditation class in my walking boot and learned to meditate alongside Ironman athletes, cyclists and yoga teachers. Meditation helped me to become more aware of myself and a mindfulness practice called body scan helped me realize that my body was healing week by week.

I also went for monthly massages and my chiropractor adjusted my ankle several times, giving me an increased range of motion. I felt scared the first time a massage therapist massaged my right lower leg, but she used gentle lymphatic drainage techniques that eased the swelling. I diligently practiced my physical therapy exercises and found myself strong enough to train for and run the Jolla half marathon in April 2015 and the Rock and Roll Half Marathon later that spring.

Spraining my ankle showed me how much running means to my life and gave me the opportunity to try integrative treatments like massage and chiropractic as well as giving me a powerful reason to learn to meditate.

Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Three Tips for Becoming More Calm and Centered

Three Things Calm, Centered Women do Every Day




by Kathleen Lisson

One: Calm, centered women are aware and accepting when they are not calm and centered. Our quick-fix society puts an emphasis on immediately eliminating any emotion that is not positive. A crying child is distracted with treats or told to ‘quiet down,’ and a teenager with text anxiety is reassured with ‘don’t worry, you’ll do fine.’  It is difficult to have an emotion without trying to change it if it is unwanted or hold on tight to it if it is wanted. We can try it ourselves with this test right now: Wherever we are, try to become aware of our posture and feel our neck, shoulders and back without immediately straightening up or moving around. It’s hard to resist! Cultivating an acceptance of our emotions, good and bad, can take away the stress of trying to be someone we are not.

Greater awareness is the another key to feeling more centered. As anyone who has snapped “I’m not angry!” to their spouse has realized, knowing when we are irritated is not always easy. ‘Waking up’ to our emotions as they happen is developed by the second thing calm, centered women do - meditate.


Two: Calm, centered women protect and nurture their daily meditation practice. Research shows that many benefits can be seen after meditating just a few minutes a day. The hard part? Finding time and motivation to make meditation a habit. Calm, centered women have found the key to keeping meditation in our daily wellness practices, right along with must-do’s like brushing our teeth. The key to making meditation into a habit is to find a ‘trigger’ that reminds us to meditate. Schedule meditation for the same place in our schedules each morning and it will become the automatic thing to do after making a cup of tea or walking the dog.

Three: Calm, centered women take time for mindfulness throughout our day. When we sense ourselves becoming agitated, breathing slowly on and out for thirty seconds or noticing the feeling of our feet on the ground helps us become centered and aware of the present moment. I have used these ‘stealth’ mindfulness exercises before taking an exam, in the middle of a meeting with colleagues, in my doctor’s office in Carmel Valley or at a noisy party or walking down the street in downtown San Diego Gaslamp district, all times where emotions and anxiety can run high.


Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Thursday, August 25, 2016

How to get Oil out of Hair - Tip from a Massage Therapist

How to wash oil out of your hair after a massage


By Kathleen Lisson, CMT, CLT

As a a Massage Therapist with training in Ayurvedic Massage in San Diego, I see a lot of clients who benefit from a relaxing scalp massage.

Ayurvedic Massage uses oil to massage the body, which means clients walk out of their massage with relaxed muscles and an oily head of hair. My secret tip for removing oil from hair is to apply their regular shampoo to dry hair before stepping into the shower, lathering and rinsing.


I tried this after a Abhyanga massage and Shirodhara treatment and it was far more effective than trying to shampoo hair after wetting it in the shower.

Shirodhara is an effective treatment for insomnia. Read the study done in California here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3921608/

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

How to Be a More Likeable Person - Meditate!

Tips for Becoming a Likeable Person

by Kathleen Lisson


Getting to the heart of likeability leads me back to a lesson I learned on the playground - but not from other children, from my own parents.

Mindful attention is what we have been crying out for every since we were little children begging our parents to look at us while playing on the playground. As children and adults, we can feel instinctively when a conversation partner isn’t really listening anymore. Their eyes will drift over our shoulder or their hand will toy with their smartphone. In an argument or discussion, their mind will be racing to perfect their reply before we have even had the chance to finish voicing our opinion.

The solution: making a meditation practice a part of our daily wellness. Regular meditators are more likeable people because they have trained their listening skills. Spending time in meditation develops the ability to pay attention in the present moment with purpose, focus, and non-judgement.

As a meditator, I am not perfect. I still get bored listening to small talk at parties but I may be able to catch myself in these mindless behaviors and reorient myself to listen to others in a purposeful, focused, non-judgemental way.


Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

How Children Can Practice Gratitude - Please share this post with a child.

Practicing Gratitude - a post for Children


by Kathleen Lisson


“Say Thank You”
“Count Your Blessings”


We’ve all been told to do these two things, especially by our parents, but life gets busy and sometimes we forget. Taking time out of your day to remember things that are good in our lives is a fun way to relax and gives our health a boost, too.


Research has shown that practicing gratitude strengthens the immune system,
reduces feelings of loneliness and anxiety increases feelings of joy. You can test it for yourself and see what being grateful feels like in your body in less than a minute!


Sit comfortably in a quiet place. Take a few deep breaths and feel your body sitting. When you are comfortable, follow these two steps for practicing gratitude:

  1. Focus on good things in our lives, and
  2. Recognize that they happened because of other people.


You can remember something nice a friend did for you or think about all the hard work that strangers did to grow and harvest the food you ate for breakfast.


How does being grateful feel inside your body? Are your shoulders less tense? Does your heart feel warm inside? Did your face relax? Did you smile?


If you liked practicing gratitude, why not make it a habit. You can even invite an adult to practice with you. Then you can celebrate Thanksgiving every day, and I don’t mean eat a turkey sandwich!


Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Where to get free Lymphatic Drainage Massage in San Diego

Where to get free and reduced cost Manual Lymphatic Drainage Massage in San Diego




by Kathleen Lisson


Many people find Manual Lymphatic drainage massage effective for reducing pain and swelling following trauma, surgery, including cosmetic surgery and some even use it as a complementary therapy during detoxification. As a long time philanthropist, I am I am pleased to partner with the Alternative Healing Network to offer massage services free of charge on most Thursday afternoons.


Alternative Healing Network offers Acupuncture, Massage, Energy Healing and Naturopathic Medical Consultations provided free of charge on a first come first served basis at the Tubman-Chavez Center and the City Heights Wellness Center on alternating Thursdays. Lymphatic Drainage Massage services will be 15 - 20 minute treatments. I encourage you to also visit with a Naturopath to get more information on how a variety of complementary treatments can benefit your health.

Find out more about Integrative Health Nights here: http://althealnet.org/outreach/integrative-health-night/

If Thursdays are inconvenient, I am available to perform full 60 and 90 minute sessions of manual lymphatic drainage at Adams Avenue Integrative Health on Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays. Services are offered on a sliding scale based on income. Make sure to request Kathleen and find more information at http://adamsavenue.althealnet.org/


If you would like the convenience of receiving 60 or 90 minute Manual Lymphatic Drainage massage treatments in the comfort of your own home in San Diego, La Jolla, Del Mar, Solana Beach, Encinitas or Carlsbad, please click here for more information: https://www.massagebook.com/sandiego

Find out more about Lymphatic Drainage massage here: https://www.youtube.com/embed/JNN70_P6uP4


How to Get Excited about Meditation!

How to get excited about Meditation (again) 


by Kathleen Lisson


Elephant Journal recently published my advice on how to use the deep, life-changing 'why' of your meditation practice to make sure that meditation has a regular place in your daily rituals.

Read the article here: http://www.elephantjournal.com/2016/08/why-we-dont-meditate/

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

7 Step Experiment - Feel the Effects of Awe in your Body


How to Feel Awe in Daily Life


by Kathleen Lisson

Standing on the Top of Mt. Kilimanjaro and feeling Awe

Balancing the demands of school, work, family and social obligations can lead to overflowing to-do lists, a feeling of busy-ness that leads to anxiety, and the sense of not having enough time to do everything. Taking time to go out in nature and ideally experience awe is one natural way to combat stress. Have you ever seen something amazing and you feel like time literally stood still? That’s the beauty of a feeling called awe.


Here’s a quick 7 step experiment that can show you the effect of awe on your own body.

  1. Take a moment to sit comfortably in a safe space and close your eyes.
  2. Take a slow, deep breath.
  3. Bring to mind a time when you experienced awe.
  4. How did it make you feel, where were you and who were you with. Really feel the emotion in your body.
  5. Notice where you felt the emotion. Did you shoulders and face relax as you remembered your experience?
  6. Open your eyes and take another deep breath.
  7. How busy and overwhelmed do you feel after the experience versus before you clicked on this article?



Remembering an experience of awe is getting just a glimpse of the positive effects that regular time outdoors in nature can provide. If you are interested in the effects of awe, read the work of UC Berkeley’s Dacher Keltner and then get outside and experience it for yourself!


Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Monday, August 15, 2016

How to Use Meditation for Better Sleep

How to Use Meditation for Better Sleep




by Kathleen Lisson

One frustrating obstacle for newer meditators is how often the sessions involve at least a few moments of sleep. If the intention of a meditation session is not sleep, there are several techniques for staying awake. But what if sleep is exactly what your body needs?


A busy travel or vacation schedule means at least a few hours of downtime on a plane, train or car. Making the most of a plane ride can be the difference between arriving at your destination groggy or refreshed. What if you could enjoy a long nap along the way and arrive feeling balanced and peaceful? I recommend trying one of the following three types of guided meditation the next time you are facing a long car, train or airplane ride.



What you need:





Types of Guided Meditation for Sleep:


  • Mantra Meditation - this technique has the meditator repeating a phrase silently over and over. The repetition can be very soothing and relaxing.
  • Body Scan - this meditation cues the meditator to focus on and relax parts of the body from the head to the feet.
  • Yoga Nidra - This type of yoga doesn’t involve movement at all! Instead, the meditator will enter a deep ‘yogic’ sleep.



A week before your trip, select a few guided meditations that sound relaxing and give them a ‘test drive’ by listening to them before bedtime. Choose one or two that really put you to sleep fast and download them or bookmark them to your favorites. Then, when you are en route to your destination, settle into your seat, get comfortable using your mask, pillow and blanket, listen to your meditation and drift off into a nourishing sleep.

Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Sunday, August 14, 2016

How to Celebrate National Relaxation Day August 15th

Celebrate National Relaxation Day with Mindfulness Exercises


by Kathleen Lisson
Take a Walk in Nature

If you have ten minutes - take a walk. Focus on each of your senses for five or six breaths as you take a pleasant walk in nature. As you walk, notice what you can see for five breaths, then what you can hear for five breaths. Continue walking and feel your feet moving for five breaths, then become aware of smells, then experiment if you can taste anything in the air or feel the texture of your tongue in your mouth. Begin again at the top of the list with sight and continue feeling each of your senses until the ten minute walk is finished. Notice if paying attention to the present moment instead of getting lost in thought has made you more relaxed. If you cannot find a place in nature, consider walking a labyrinth! Find labyrinths in San Diego here: LabyrinthLocator.com

If you have five minutes - try a body scan. Sitting or lying down, find a comfortable position and gently focus on different parts of your body in this relaxing technique. Start by feeling your toes for two breaths, then feel each different body part, switching every second inhale. Breathe and feel the feet, ankles, lower legs and knees. Continue to focus on how your body feels from the inside of your thighs, hips, lower back, abdomen, upper back, shoulders, chest, arms, hands and fingers. Finish your body scan by feeling inside your neck, jaw, face, ears and scalp, each for two breaths. Finally, focus on your entire body breathing peacefully for a few breaths. Warning! This exercise may result in falling asleep and is great for practicing right before bedtime.  

If you have one minute - focus on your breath. This exercise can be done at your desk or even in a tense meeting! Take a slow deep inhale through your nose, then exhale through your nose. Count to two, then inhale again. Pausing in between breaths brings relaxation.

Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Is Massage Effective for Reducing Pain in Patrients with a Cancer Diagnosis?

How to Reduce Cancer Related Pain 


by Kathleen Lisson, CMT, CLT

As an oncology trained massage therapist trained in San Diego, I am interested in scientific research studying the effect of massage therapy on the side effects of cancer treatment including chemotherapy and radiation. One major side effect of cancer treatment is pain.

There is a study titled 'Meta-analysis of Massage Therapy on Cancer Pain' published in Integrative Cancer Therapies that shows "massage therapy significantly reduced cancer pain compared with no massage treatment or conventional care" and that "massage is effective for the relief of cancer pain, especially for surgery-related pain. Among the various types of massage, foot reflexology appeared to be more effective than body or aroma massage."


Read the full study here: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273784974_Meta-Analysis_of_Massage_Therapy_on_Cancer_Pain

Thursday, August 11, 2016

How to Use Meditation to Get to Sleep Faster

Three Tips for Getting a Full Night's Sleep


by Kathleen Lisson


A full 8-9 hours of restful rejuvenating sleep is a key part of wellness and the only way I can train hard in the morning and then work a full day. The hard part: disconnecting from technology and getting to sleep in the first place.

I have been married for a few years and my husband and I are still working out bedtime rules we can both follow. Turning off electronics a half hour before bedtime and tucking ourselves in at least 8 hours before the morning alarm is set is key to making sure that our tomorrows will be as productive as possible. For me, a busy day filled with emotion almost guarantees tossing and turning after the lights are turned off unless I practice my favorite sleepy-time meditation. My choice: a mantra meditation that lets me focus on well wishes to relieve all being’s suffering. Another meditation practice called body scan has great results for many meditators I have spoken to. I can completely relax and let go when I am totally focused on repeating my mantra in my head.


What's the Difference Between Regular Meditation and Meditation for Sleep?


The difference: in my morning meditation I am sitting and focused on staying alert and in the present moment. In the evening, I am settled comfotably in bed and the focus is on being absorbed in the mantra.


Kathleen’s Bedtime Rules:


  • Turn off electronics a half hour before bedtime
  • Tuck yourself in at least 8 hours before the morning alarm
  • If anxiety is ruining your sleep, end the day with a Mantra Meditation or Body Scan


Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Tips for Overcoming a Running Plateau

How to Get Out of a Running Rut


by Kathleen Lisson


As a San Diego half marathon runner, an ACE Certified Personal Trainer and a RRCA Certified Running Coach I have seen first-hand the effects of getting into a running rut in my off season. I enjoy periodized workouts when training for half marathons, but how do I keep my interest in running for the months I’m not actively training? Here are my tips for getting out of a running plateau.


San Diego offers 12 months of good weather for outdoor workouts, so San Diego athletes can get stuck in a workout plateau if they are working with a growth-based mindset but not a growth-based workout routine. During the first few months of a running program, focusing on improved health is easy - we are running farther and faster and our body is becoming stronger. Once we are locked into our workout, only negative feedback will drive us to prevent the loss of our fitness gains. This prevention mindset feedback is mostly failure based - we can see when we didn't run according to our schedule that our running times are slower and it is harder to complete long runs.


Smart coaches and athletes organize their workouts according to periodization - the concept that athletes get stronger with a workout that changes as the athlete gets closer to competition. All athletes can take advantage of this concept by throwing a few fitness hacks into their routine when their workout gets stale.


Take it up a notch - increase the weight you lift in your weight workout and balance that with less repetitions and sets. If you are stuck at 3 sets of 12, experiment with lifting more weight in 2 sets of 7. Do the math to make sure you are lifting the same total pounds in your entire workout. Changing the weight will allow your muscles to react to heavier weights.


Run longer - stuck in a 6 mile loop routine that stopped giving you results months ago? Run the same weekly mileage, but vary the miles in each workout. For instance, replace two 6 mile runs with running 8 miles one day and 4 miles the other.  Keeping the same total weekly mileage will allow your body to run longer distances without overtraining.


Run your route backwards - Tired of your running route? Seen the same lawn ornaments and especially in San Diego, rock gardens a million times? Try heading out your door in the other direction and notice the difference that running in the opposite direction and on the opposite side of the street can provide.


Fartlek - Bored because you are logging the same mile times for every run? Try Fartlek in your next run. Simply increase the pace from one light pole or fire hydrant along your route to the next one. Return to your normal pace to cool down, then choose another section of the road to sprint to. Runners can improve their times by incorporating this gentle interval work into everyday runs.


Try a new class - If you have a gym membership, there is no excuse to get into a fitness rut. Look at the class schedule and try a class you have never taken. Relish feeling uncoordinated and sore from working muscles in new ways, and return to your tried-and-true routine with a new perspective.

Borrow a friend’s teenager - Do any of your friends have teenagers involved in sports? Ask to go along on one of their weekend solo workouts.  You’ll get a chance to try out a different stretching and warmup routine and push the pace with a new partner. This is especially valuable for athletes who have played the same sport for decades. Exercise science has improved since the days we stretched out in high school. Check out the new routines and add what works for you to your regular exercise regimen.

Monday, August 8, 2016

Three Tips for a Mindful Visit to the Museum - Worldwide Art Day

Three Tips for a Mindful Visit to the Museum


How to Enjoy a Mindful Museum Visit

by Kathleen Lisson

The most stunning piece of artwork I ever saw was the Mona Lisa. I remember feeling pulled in by her stare, and feeling confused - could a painting really be looking directly at me? I also remember the crowd of dozens and dozens of people in the room slowly shuffling forward forward, excitedly talking to one another and then … turning their backs to the famous painting to take a selfie. To truly interact with paintings and sculpture instead of just collect selfies, follow these three tips to mindfully experience an art museum:

Step One - Sit or stand in a dignified position. Our focus and energy are at their peak when the spine is straight and our body is rising up from the ground. Visiting the restroom before starting a museum walk, eating before our visit, wearing comfortable shoes and turning our phones off will remove many common obstacles to fully enjoying an art exhibit.

Step Two - Open the door for mindfulness. Once we enter the museum, take time to slow down from the busy day.  With eyes closed, take a few deeper breaths and focus on feeling the air go in and out of  our lungs. Begin to feel senses in the body by noticing the feet and the feeling of clothes on the body. After a few minutes of this preparation, open the eyes and begin to experience the artwork.

Step Three - Check in to the body’s experience. What emotions are felt when looking at a painting or sculpture? Where specifically are those emotions felt in the body? Artwork can make us feel many things, from tear-filled eyes and full and warm heart of captivation to the twisting gut and pounding heart of uncertainty and fear. If sharing our feelings feels comfortable, quietly share impressions with a friend.

Inciting a viewer’s reaction and response is the very purpose of art. These three tips will help art lovers more fully experience art and recognize the artist’s viewpoint.



Kathleen Lisson is a certified Meditation Teacher and Labyrinth Facilitator and teaches Meditation and Mindfulness at IPSB college in San Diego. Sign up for a private meditation lesson or labyrinth walk in the comfort of your home here: https://www.massagebook.com/San_Diego~Massage~sandiego?src=external

Tips to Reduce Shoulder Pain - Change Your Habits and Do These Post Massage Exercises

How to Reduce Shoulder Pain by Kathleen Lisson CMT, CLT When I provide manual lymphatic drainage to reduce swelling after surgery,...